#WhatIRead – The Sialkot Saga

Hi Folks,

Wish you all a happy Wednesday morning. Isn’t it sublime to know that you’re in the mid of another week and you can almost sniff the excitement of the weekend? Well, I’ve reached my workspace pretty early today thanks to the opposition’s call for a nation-wide Bandh. Man, I used to love being in school for all these unpredictable holidays… Anyway, it’s not too bad being grown up, you can get used to getting your salary. The trouble only strikes when you start evaluating your goals vs your money, and then shit gets real! 

I digress.

Here’s what you came for! 

So I recently finished Ashwin Sanghi’s ‘The Sialkot Saga’, and I couldn’t quite make up my mind over it. I definitely liked the read but there were plenty of loopholes so I’ll just treat it like a dose of Bollywood entertainment. 

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a. The name has barely anything to do with what transpires in the book… And the cover is definitely a giveaway of sorts if you know what I mean! (wink wink)

b. I have always looked at Ashwin Sanghi as The Indian Dan Brown but after reading this particular novel, I’m inclined to also refer to him as The Indian Jeffrey Archer. Need I say more? I bet you’ve already guessed the plotline!

c. I quite liked how he’s tried to sketch over the characters of the protagonist. It was a real page-turner, I won’t deny that but there was something missing – like a good soul. 

d. I absolutely loved how the author integrated almost ALL important events that occurred in Indian History post Independence. You’ll read about the political scenario of India right from Nehru’s times to the chaos of the Gandhi era, to Vajpayee’s unsuccessful stints. It’s not just politics, owing to the economic interests of a certain protagonist, there’s a whole lot of connection to India’s foreign policies, trade unions, et al.

e. It’s also interesting to note that the major terrorist attacks that happened have found mention in the book in one way or another. You’ve got to give the credits to the author, in between weaving from the past and the present, he’s certainly tried his best to keep the plot as real as possible. 

Final Verdict?

To be honest, you aren’t missing out much if you give this a skip but if you’re remotely interested in Indian history and politics, then it’s a good refresher and you may even spot out some erroneous gaps in the timeline! That said, every book deserves its due. So, pick up this, or pick up that, and stick to it! You’ll always be better off after reading! 

So long, then!

Adios, and Happy Reading! 🙂